Connecting Columbia Union Seventh-day Adventists

Seventh-day Adventist

The Adventist-laymen's Services & Industries (ASI) Columbia Union chapter (CUASI) recently held their annual convention at Potomac Conference’s Vienna (Va.) church. Some 700 attendees, including church members, donated some $10,000 to fund upcoming CUASI projects that aim to fulfill ASI’s motto of “Sharing Christ in the Marketplace.”

“The territory that comprises our great union is best viewed as a mission field that God has called us to reach,” says Frank Bondurant, Columbia Union Conference vice president for Ministries Development. “Accordingly one of the fundamental core values for our next quinquennium is to ‘impact our communities by revealing the love of Christ, sharing the distinct Adventist message and inviting people to accept Christ as their Savior.’”

In 2010 Mikhail Kulakov, DPhil, became director and editor-in-chief of the Bible Translation Institute, which is based at Washington Adventist University. While Kulakov is based at the Takoma Park, Md.-campus, he is partnering with the Zaosky Adventist Seminary and Institute in Russia.

Kettering Adventist HealthCare (KAHC) in Kettering, Ohio, and the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati recently announced a joint effort in caring for high-risk newborns. Under their new collaboration, the Cincinnati hospital will provide neonatal and neonatal subspecialty coverage to KAHC’s new Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Kettering Medical Center.

Each year for the past seven years, Allegheny East’s Emmanuel Brinklow church in Ashton, Md., has hosted a special program that celebrates three people who have made a positive impact on the world. Last Sabbath under the theme “Am I My Brother’s Keeper,” the church again honored three more at its Living Legends Awards for Service to Humanity program. Bob Zellner, whose parents were once members of the Klu Klux Klan, became a civil rights activist after interviewing Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks for a sociology paper. Zellner, then a college student, was struck by something Parks told him: “When you see something wrong, you have to make a stand for it. You can’t study it forever.” Zellner went on to become the first white field secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee—a notable civil rights group.